Dietitians

Year
Dos and Don’ts of Eating Fish
Hong Kong Chinese are very fond of eating fish. There is certainly no shortage of fish on offer like wild and farmed fish, it is also easy to find imported fish such as sole, mackerel and salmon. To help you make choices, dietitian Candy SIN offers some tips on smart and healthy ways to enjoy...
Steaming and Grilling: Healthy Ways to Cook Fish
In Hong Kong, many people like to eat raw fish, but Candy explains that the nutritional benefits of raw fish differ little from cooked fish as there is no substantial change in the calorie, protein and total fat content (Table 2) but uncooked food have higher risk of food safety. It is important,...
Fish -Low Fat, High Protein
Candy Sin, Accredited Practising Dietitian (DAA, AUS) and Editor of Hong Kong Nutrition Association, explains that fish, similar to pork, beef, mutton and chicken meat, is a major source of animal protein. Oily fish is also particularly rich in polyunsaturated fat omega-3fatty acids, including...
Quick stir-frying and steaming: key to retention of nutrients
Vitamins B-complex and C are water-soluble and thus may be lost through leaching during prolonged cooking. Steaming, which minimises the food’s contact with water, appears to be the best method for retaining the nutrients...
Pan-frying and deep-frying:
According to Cherry, pan-frying or deep-frying is different from steaming or blanching the same ingredients in terms of caloric value and fat content (Table 1). Moreover, most deep-fried foods have a coating of either batter...